Sunday, September 13, 2015

September? Already?

In the interim between when I posted and now, it has become September. And I've been busy. Perhaps not too busy to post, but I haven't had the interest over the summer to do so since it was so hot, although this was the first summer in three in Southern Nevada that I've finally learned to at least tolerate the season. That was helped along by the air conditioning going out in my family's apartment the night before the hottest day of the year.

Fortunately, we made enough noise that we were pushed to the top of the list the next day for repairs and even though it was unbearable, even with soaking t-shirts and having lots of water in many different ways (including splashing oneself), I finally began to understand the heat here. You can't fight it, but you can protect yourself enough against it so that it doesn't become as monstrous as it usually is. More water, certainly, but also not putting so much stock in it, like worrying about how hot it's going to get. It's the summer. It's what it is. At least in the winter, you can be outside for a few minutes longer if you're bundled up enough. I'm going to be learning that soon enough.

And the reason I'm going to be learning that soon enough is that I finally got a job at an elementary school here in Henderson, close enough to my own neighborhood! Of course, that will change when we move from our current residence back to where we used to live last year, and then I'll be even closer to this elementary school, although the closeness is debatable. But consider this: Right now, in the mornings, I take the bus to just after the small Green Valley and Silver Springs intersection, across the street from Pacific Islands, which is where we're moving back to early next year, if not sooner, depending on if our current apartment complex will let us out of our lease owing to mold and other issues inside this apartment. We've contacted a few other people to see if it can be done, including the Office of the Ombudsman here in Nevada, which seems to oversee apartrment complexes as well.

Anyway, taking the bus to Green Valley and Silver Springs, I walk to the Green Valley and Silver Springs intersection, cross it, then walk to the Green Valley and Robindale intersection, and cross the street to Robindale. It's a little over a mile to my school, which lately has been 25 minutes. Sometimes I get to time it, and sometimes the music teacher picks me up on the way, usually about a half mile there. I'm becoming more and more well known in this school, and it's the kind of school where everyone is amenable toward everyone else. It's nice to work in this kind of atmosphere.

The job is what I've wanted for so long: I'm a library aide! Every single day, I get to work in a library, and the Friday before last was Staff Development Day across the entire school district, so not only were there no students that day, but teachers and specialists alike went to meetings elsewhere, including my librarian, so it was the first time I had a library all to myself that wasn't at home! I nearly counted my two weeks and a handful of days as a substitute library aide at Rowe Elementary two school years ago, when that school didn't have a librarian in the budget, so the library aide ran everything. However, in that case, I only had the library to myself in the morning. This was an entire day! And it went way too fast.

I love my new library. The nonfiction section is in the central part of the library, right when you walk in, and it surrounds the tables in the middle and the storytime rug area to the right. Then on the other side of the library is the rest of the nonfiction section on the left, the fiction section on the upper right, and the picture books on the lower right. There's also room on the top of the stacks to put books that might be interesting for the kids, so I also have a lot of fun doing that. And unlike volunteering every Saturday morning at the Green Valley Library, nobody changes my picks. It's all my own. They've all gotten a fair amount of traction, and I'd say that at least 10 books that I put up top were checked out. A good average. Tomorrow, since the first period of the day in the library is a prep period, I'm going to take down all the books and replace them with others. I've come up with a method in which the three books on top of each section of the stacks represents the three sets of shelves in those sections. So the first book represents the first shelf, the second book the second shelf, and the third book the third shelf. It makes it easier not to have to put a book away in a section far away from that particular part of the stack.

Plus, this week, the Scholastic Book Fair begins on Friday, and everything needed for the Book Fair is being delivered on Wednesday. There'll be a lot of boxes to open up, and a lot of books to put on the rolling metal bookcases provided. I can't wait to see what appears for sale besides what was advertised on the Book Fair DVD shown to the students, as well as what was in the flyer.

I'm also still writing book reviews, which is always worthwhile, and still reading, of course. This is only the beginning, I'm sure, and I'm not only glad to have this job, but also to see where it will take me.

Thursday, July 2, 2015

Four-Day Fantasy Bliss

Today, I volunteered at the Green Valley Library, an unusual day for me to do it, because the library's closed tomorrow, Saturday, Sunday and Monday. It's always closed Sunday and Monday because that's how it's been ever since I got here, and probably even before, during the economic crash which caused two branches to be closed (the Malcolm branch and the Galleria branch, inside the Galleria at Sunset mall), and then hours were scaled back. More recently, albeit many, many months ago, hours were taken from the Green Valley and Gibson branches in order to open the Paseo Verde branch, the flagship branch, on Mondays. So instead of the Green Valley Library opening at 9:30 a.m., it opens at 10. There were other changes in the operating hours, but I've long forgotten what they were.

Normally, I volunteer on Saturdays, but that was impossible this week. And yet, I wish I could. I wish I had keys to the library, access to the alarm codes so I could spend the 4th of July weekend there. The library would be entirely empty and only for me. I would probably have breakfast on the way there, and bring lunch with me. Of course, I could spend all day and all through the night in the Green Valley Library, but I do have family in humans and dogs and birds alike, so I couldn't be away for that long. I'd let some time pass before returning, to build up the anticipation again.

I'd walk in through the back door, put my stuff down behind the circulation counter, and shelve whatever still needs to be shelved, any holds that might be left on that cart and certainly books sitting on the carts nearest the fiction side of the library. That would take all of 20 minutes to a half hour, depending on the workload.

I wouldn't turn on any of the computers. That wouldn't make any sense to me, because I'd be there for the library, not for the accompanying technology. I love the DVD section, the nonfiction DVDs on one side and the movies and TV shows on the other, and of course the audiobooks, but I would only want the books, and enough light in which to read whatever I'd want, whatever I could find. It would be the perfect setting in which to read Country, Danielle Steel's latest novel, which I only want to read because part of it takes place at the Wynn here in Las Vegas, and I want to see how she portrayed it (It has absolutely NOTHING to do with my mom being a huge Danielle Steel fan when I was growing up, and me reading a good number of her novels in turn, out of curiosity). But on the Claim Jumper shelves, which has copies of books that have a long number of holds, these copies available only at this particular library, there's no copy of Country. Disappointing, but I move on.

There's a shiny, squashy brown leather armchair in front of the new books for children, next to the separate children's area. I think I'd spend most of my hours there, as it's very close to the reading recliner I have at home. But most important to me is getting to know the collections completely, all the books I probably have missed while restocking the various displays in the library as a volunteer, all the DVD titles I haven't seen yet that could be intriguing for some other time, and knowing all the picture books there truly are in this library, because those shelves are packed tightly There are some books that when you pull them out, two try to come out with them, either on one side or on opposite sides.

I'm not sure what books I would want to read. Part of me would just want to read in the spur of the moment, and another part of me wonders what Nero Wolfe mystery novels they have that I might have missed. There was an omnibus I had read, but I think that's the only major one there. And yet, there are also the Robert Goldsborough continuations, of which the library has a few. Perhaps it would be time to try them again. But there's also presidential history, and one or two movie books I haven't gotten to yet, and Bob Stanley's history of pop music ("Yeah! Yeah! Yeah!: The Story of Pop Music from Bill Haley to Beyonce") and....and.....and.....

Then there's also the thought of what books would be in the spirit of spending four days alone in this library, books to represent in print the blissful peace I'd feel, great comfort, quiet eagerness, amazement at how many books there actually are when you have them all to yourself. I'm sure the books and other materials would want some rest during these four days, time to themselves, but I think a caretaker like me would not be a bother. Not every book gets attention when patrons are browsing. I would do my very best to give each one attention, even if it's only in lingering passing, to at least notice it. Overall, they make up a relatively hefty collection, but in getting specific with them, they're merely themselves, one after the other, each one with different stories to try, and ideas to explore. For example, I have my religion. It's books and libraries. But I'd want to see exactly how many books there are about Buddhism in the library, which I've been curious about for anthropological reasons. Also because there are times when I do feel monkish, when I would love to have a library as a monastery. I did that once, at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences' Margaret Herrick Library in Beverly Hills, when I was doing research for a book that may never happen. It truly is an American monastery and heaven for a movie buff like me. I would want to see if I could capture that same monastic feeling in a library that truly serves a whole community, not just a piece of one. I think I could. Sadly, I can't live in a library (although my room sometimes come close), so this would be the next best thing.

(Speaking of that, I can now reveal this: Two weeks ago, I was hired to be the new library aide at Cox Elementary, which is in the general vicinity of my neighborhood and is very much the next best thing. I finally get to do what I want to do! I hope that this will lead to doing even more of what I want to do, which is simply to contribute everything I can give to libraries through my work for them. I should think a year and a half of volunteering at the Green Valley Library while waiting on a position there (the part-time shelver position would be enormously convenient because it would boost me to nearly 40 hours a week), and the year and a half I spent as a substitute everything in the school district, including a great many stints as a substitute library aide show that already. My new job will show it even more.)

In reality, I will never be able to get into the Green Valley Library during this July 4th weekend. My imagination will do it for me throughout the days.

Monday, June 22, 2015

Summer in Vegas

Want to visit Hell? Visit Las Vegas! Come enjoy the temperatures that make this valley Satan's winter home!

It's only bearable with air-conditioning. We lost ours at 5 p.m. the day before yesterday, and spent a good portion of yesterday without it, though thankfully while one of the maintenance guys in our apartment complex was fixing it, replacing the exploded compressor and the fan and the fan motor. It makes me appreciate not only having air conditioning, but understanding even more the effect of the heat in this valley during the summer. You'd think the previous two summers would have done that too, but the air conditioning never broke down during either of those summers.

The Saturday morning before this happened, I actually went to the Green Valley Library the earliest I ever have to volunteer, because of the heat. I took the bus to the Green Valley and Sunset intersection, as I usually do, walked to the back door of the library, rang the doorbell, and one of the two children's librarians let me in, they the first two to be there that early. I loved it because not only could I start on my work at 8:00 a.m., before the library opened at 10:00 a.m. (the first part of that work was shelving all the holds which took up all the shelves on one side of a massive, ugly, though reinforced and heavy-duty cart, and one of the shelves on the other side), but the library is completely empty at that hour. I have it all to myself, full run of it if I want. I'm going to do the same next Saturday and the Saturday after and so on until the heat breaks, or if I'm hired by them as a part-time shelver, a position that's opening up in July for August. After a year and a half of volunteering for the library, I'm going to do everything possible to try to snag that job. It may fit in nicely with another job I'm involved in, but don't want to reveal just yet until the papers are signed some time this week. Once they are, I'll finally be able to do what I want to do, having spent an official year in the school district to get to this point (the year and a half I spent as a substitute everything doesn't count according to the district, but that's ok, because the experience I had during that time helped me get here).

So I'm still here, finally cool enough again, but with a lot more happiness on the way.

Wednesday, April 15, 2015


Not dead. Busy with work, as a resource room aide at an elementary school here in Las Vegas, busy with writing, including my book reviews and books I'm toying with writing (including a possible illustrated children's book, which surprised me. Not illustrated by me, since I don't have any of those skills, but someone if it sells), and busy with life. I'm out of practice with writing a blog, but surely there's much to write about from these past few months, this long gap. I just never had that driving interest to contribute anything here, not when there was a book review to work on (as there will be tonight, ahead of a near-late May deadline, which makes me want to finish the review earlier so I can get more books to review. After all, that's money I'm sitting on), not when there were books to read, not when there were movies to watch, not when there was more life to see in Las Vegas, a lot of strange, yet interesting life at that.

I will try, though. After all, this is my blog and no one else's, and I don't want it to gather ever more dust. I'll see what I come up with.

Wednesday, December 24, 2014

The Passive-Aggressive Washing Machine, or: Who Ya Gonna Call?

Amongst the features in our still-new apartment is a passive-aggressive washing machine. You put in your detergent and your clothes (or vice-versa), turn the knob to the setting you want, and then it locks the lid, to "sense" how much water it has to spurt into the tub. This takes about an hour and a half.

Then, after spit-taking water into its tub for 2 hours, it says, "Okaaaay. Okaaaay. I'll get staaaarted." It does, turning and turning in an annoyed, gun-metal mechanical sound, quieter than our other machines. So it has that going for it, and a dryer that, thanks to having gas in this apartment, only takes 20 minutes to dry a large load. But it still remains the passive-aggressive washing machine. Or the Ghostbusters washing machine, being that when it "senses" how large a load is in the machine, it bangs around like a ghost inside the Ghost Trap.


In the bathroom across from the bedroom/den belonging to my sister and I in our family's new apartment (she has the bedroom side, while I converted the den side into my bedroom. Smaller, but it has all the space I need for my books. We moved on Thanksgiving weekend, and I'm sure I'll have more to write about in the weeks ahead. There's just been no time while working and writing book reviews and trying to get my own writing projects going), there's a green light over the toilet that she and I call Blinky. It's convenient at, say, 4 in the morning, not having to turn on the bathroom light because that small light on the quiet, ever-running fan keeps blinking whenever someone's in the bathroom. Sure, it goes on and off and on and off rapidly, but there's enough light there to do what you need to and wash your hands afterward.

To some, it might seem like using the bathroom during an acid trip or a Vietnam flashback. But at that hour of the morning, the bathroom can be as green as it wants. I only wish there were a few Alice in Wonderland elements within it to make it more fun.

Nevertheless, I'll do my best to post more here.

Sunday, November 2, 2014

Magazines Hunt Me

I always know exactly what books I want to read. I allow for some surprises, like bumping into actor Danny Aiello's memoir at the Green Valley Library yesterday, but like reviewing Empire of Sin by Gary Krist for BookBrowse, which I waited months to read, there's very little I don't know about books either coming out or that have come out that I want.

It's different with magazines. Back in Southern California, I subscribed to The New Yorker because John Boston, the historical face of The Signal newspaper in the Santa Clarita Valley, where I interned, subscribed to it. I considered him a friend and mentor, and still do, and so I wanted to read what he read. But I let that subscription expire this past September because it didn't fit me anymore. I wanted writing that encompassed all 50 states, not just everything from a New York City perspective. I wanted to read writers from Kansas, Oklahoma, New Mexico, Florida, varied perspectives that I could get to know.

On my 30th birthday, my family and I went to McCarran International so I could walk through the Howard W. Cannon Aviation Museum there, a small set of exhibits spread throughout the airport, accessible by all except for those exhibits in the gate areas of the airport.

I walked through the exhibits, reading all the historical information about the formation of aviation in Las Vegas, but what interested me more were the shops in the airport, including a stunningly detailed newsstand, with magazines from everywhere. I looked at them all, glancing over the glossy fashion magazines, and honing in on the ones about travel, particularly National Geographic Traveler, which truly spans the world. I'm interested in Japan and Sweden and China, I want to visit all the presidential libraries in the nation (save for Reagan's and Nixon's, both of which I went to when I lived in Southern California, Reagan's numerous times for the gently mountainous view from the replica of the South Lawn of the White House), I want to visit Florida to see how my old haunts have changed, to travel throughout New Mexico, and to visit New Orleans. So a magazine that lets me see the sights of the world from my beloved reading recliner without having to spend hours on the Internet is my kind of magazine.

However, I haven't subscribed to it yet because I haven't found new issues anywhere I usually go, including Target, where I last found it, and Smith's supermarket, where I think I once found it. I want to read one or two more before I decide whether to subscribe, but so far it's hard to do that. It's easier with The Sondheim Review, a quarterly magazine devoted to one of my heroes, quite possibly the Zeus of the musical theater, which I've been eyeing for some time. There are two archival issues, one from Spring 1999 about Kelsey Grammer and Christine Baranski starring in an L.A. concert production of Sweeney Todd, and another from Fall 1998 with Carol Burnett and director Eric D. Schaeffer discussing the revised version of Putting It Together, which was also staged in L.A. I'll use those to decide whether to subscribe to The Sondheim Review, though chances are I might very well do so anyway after reading both issues, since the entire magazine is devoted to Sondheim, after all.

For others, I'm not yet sure. Saveur magazine changed editors-in-chiefs and I worry that the quality will decline dramatically. New Mexico Magazine might very well stay with me, but I hope that they cover the same yearly events in different ways. Of course, considering that it's been around since 1923, they've figured out different ways, but I just hope that the same high quality I've been getting so far remains.

Generally, outside of these experiences, I like to let the magazines hunt me. I know what I like to read, I have some ideas of what I want to read, but I'm not as dogged as I am with books. That's why, at Target today while the dogs were being groomed, my disappointment in not finding the latest issue of National Geographic Traveler mostly faded when I found a quarterly magazine called American Road, all about America's two-lane highways and the sights and sounds and experiences they offer. Trains and planes, sure. That's what National Geographic Traveler is for. While I haven't read all of the Autumn 2014 issue of American Road yet, I get the sense that it goes deep into the United States, what I've hoped to find in some magazine. I can't travel widely right now, but I can certainly read about it and it feels like this might be my gateway into learning so much more about the entire United States, beyond the books I check out, because no doubt American Road keeps track of what's happening today. I might subscribe.

Never too many magazines, though. I don't need Time or Newsweek or anything else with news that seems to change by the hour but pretends that it changes by the week. I want magazines with articles to really consider, and these feel like the greatest possibilities. I wouldn't be surprised if another one hunts me down at another Target or even at that airport newsstand whenever we visit again. I'd consider it just like these ones.